University of Michigan Law School
Civil Rights Litigation Clearinghouse
Title "Segregation Now"
Date Apr 16, 2014
Author Nikole Hannah-Jones
Author Institution ProPublica
External Link http://www.propublica.org/article/segregation-now-full-text
Abstract In Tuscaloosa today, nearly one in three black students attends a school that looks as if Brown v. Board of Education never happened.

In 2000, another federal judge released Tuscaloosa City Schools from the court-ordered desegregation mandate that had governed it for a single generation. Central had successfully achieved integration, the district had argued—it could be trusted to manage that success going forward.

Freed from court oversight, Tuscaloosa’s schools have seemed to move backwards in time. The citywide integrated high school is gone, replaced by three smaller schools. Central retains the name of the old powerhouse, but nothing more. A struggling school serving the city’s poorest part of town, it is 99 percent black. D’Leisha, an honors student since middle school, has only marginal college prospects. Predominantly white neighborhoods adjacent to Central have been gerrymandered into the attendance zones of other, whiter schools.


This Resource Relates To
case Lee v. Macon County Bd. of Ed. (SD-AL-0002)

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